idiosyncratic

wandering through the web

Colombia: 'Aquí hay racismo de Estado'

africanoexiste:

La semana pasada se registró un fuerte desplante por parte de los ministros del Interior, Minas y Justicia a la Defensoría del Pueblo, quien los había invitado a un foro sobre la crisis de derechos humanos en el Pacífico colombiano. Dicho desplante abrió nuevamente la discusión sobre las regiones y poblaciones olvidadas del país por parte del Gobierno central. Por eso, para conocer cómo recibieron las comunidades negras lo sucedido la semana pasada, El Espectador habló con Ray Charrupí, director de Chao Racismo, quien asegura que este gabinete cada día es más excluyente y racista.”

Buena entrevista dejando las cosas claras

5centsapound:

Colin Delfosse: Wizards of the boxing ring – Kinshasa 2010T

Their name? City Train, Texas, Mabokotomo, Petit Cimetière, Sibolite or Zombie de Kibami. Their job? During the day they run a stall or drive a taxi. In the evening they put on their mask and loin cloth and become characters in one of the planet’s most off-beat sports : Congolese wrestling. In 2008 Kinshasa is still one of the densest and busiest cities on the continent. Eight million inhabitants from all corners of the country have come here to seek refuge, a job, a family. In the perpetual shambles, everyone gets by, adapts, invents in order to survive. This is how wrestling in Zaire was born twenty or so years ago and was logically renamed Congolese wrestling after Mobutu fell. Even though there are hundreds of wrestlers throughout the country, the majority of them are based in Kinshasa. Inspired by American wrestling which is shown on television all day long, this discipline is as far from the big business of Los Angeles wrestling as the spirit world is from the physical one. Spirit… or rather spirits. The uniqueness of this sport is that magic isn’t outside the ring but in it. Each fighter uses black magic. In the suburbs of Kinshasa, in the rickety rings, muscular collision and technical tricks are only preliminary moves. The fight, the real fight, will be between opponent’s spells. This kind of show is loved by thousands of street children, or ‘shégués’. Many ‘shégués’ fight in the ring. In this resourceful country, wrestling is an alternative to the street and sometimes even helps people find work. Wrestling, and its surrounding beliefs command either respect or fear : two assets in a city as crowded and poor as Kinshasa

5centsapound:

Colin Delfosse: The PKK Amazons - Iraq, 2009

Entrenched in the mountainous region of Qandil in Northern Iraq, women of all ages and social conditions, armed with Kalashnikovs, are fighting for their ideals. The movement of Free Women of Kurdistan (PAJK), born from a disagreement with the PKK (Kurdistan Workers Party), aims to offer an alternative model for Kurdish and Middle Eastern women. The PKK (considered as a terrorist organisation by the US and EU) influence does not decrease: the repression suffered by Kurds in the region have driven many young women to join the ranks of the guerrilla. Now, more than 2,000 female fighters, mostly from Turkey but also Syria, Iran, Iraq, and Europe, are going underground struggling for freedom and rights of Kurdish people.

Bottle Blonde #1, 2012 | Michael Paul Britto

Bottle Blonde #1, 2012 | Michael Paul Britto

thegetty:

She is a young woman dressed in domestic servant attire.
One of 32 images in this album of a British merchant family in Brazil from 1844 - 1865, this is one of the earliest known photographs a black person taken in Brazil.
From an album of portraits of a British merchant family, ca. 1844-53, Charles DeForest Fredericks. Getty Research Institute.

thegetty:

She is a young woman dressed in domestic servant attire.

One of 32 images in this album of a British merchant family in Brazil from 1844 - 1865, this is one of the earliest known photographs a black person taken in Brazil.

From an album of portraits of a British merchant family, ca. 1844-53, Charles DeForest Fredericks. Getty Research Institute.

(via nonafaustine)

reclaimingthelatinatag:

Extended trailer for the documentary Negrita.

From the film’s Official WordPress:

NEGRITA, written and directed by Magdalena Albizu, is a documentary about the  Afro-Latina identity and experience in the United States.

Black Latinos/as are often overlooked or dichotomized as either “black” or “hispanic” in the United States.  However, according to the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB) , Hispanic or Latino origin can be viewed as the heritage, nationality group, lineage, or country of birth of the person or the person’s parents or ancestors before their arrival in the United States. Hispanic or Latino origin is independent of race and is termed “ethnicity” by the United States Census Bureau.

NEGRITA highlights individual unique Afro-Latina experiences within a broad range of skin color and ethnicity across the United States, while revealing psychological and social factors that add to the confusion, uncertainty, shame and affirmation about one’s self-image of being both “Black”and “Latina”.

NEGRITA aims to establish a ‘black’ consciousness across all generations by reigniting a movement to embrace Latinos’ African roots through a trans-national dialogue on race, identity, ethnicity, nationality and community-building.

Negrita is currently set to be completed September, 2014.

Donate online: http://negritadocumentary.wordpress.com/donate
Website: www.negritadocumentary.com
Follow: @NegritaDoc on Twitter and Facebook

micdotcom:

19 #WhyIStayed tweets everyone needs to see

While many cheered the NFL’s move to (finally) punish Rice’s vicious behavior, too many media outlets immediately fell into a tired pattern of victim blaming. 

Writer Beverly Gooden had heard enough. “I was watching the responses to the TMZ on my timeline, and I noticed a trend. People were asking ‘why did she marry him?’ and ‘why didn’t she leave him,’” Gooden told Mic. “When I saw those tweets, my first reaction was shame. The same shame that I felt back when I was in a violent marriage. It’s a sort of guilt that would make me crawl into a shell and remain silent. But today, for a reason I can’t explain, I’d had enough. I knew I had an answer to everyone’s question of why victims of violence stay. I can’t speak for Janay Rice, I can only speak for me.”

Gooden decided to change the conversation. Follow micdotcom

(via chescaleigh)

npr:

Whitman Wilcox V attended kindergarten through second grade at a neighborhood public school in the Lower Ninth Ward. He had just started the third grade when Hurricane Katrina hit in August 2005. His family was forced to evacuate; he wound up at a Catholic school in Houston.
Back in New Orleans the next fall, he switched to a brand-new charter school, KIPP Believe, for fifth through 8th grade; started high school at another charter school, Sci Academy; then was homeschooled for a year.
Now, he’s beginning his senior year of high school. This time at St. Augustine, an all-boys Catholic school famed throughout the region for its marching band.
Five schools in nine years. A generation of children who’ve lived through the storm and recovery have traced educational odysseys like this one.
Q&A: One Student’s Educational Saga In New Orleans
Photo credit: Edmund D. Fountain for NPR

npr:

Whitman Wilcox V attended kindergarten through second grade at a neighborhood public school in the Lower Ninth Ward. He had just started the third grade when Hurricane Katrina hit in August 2005. His family was forced to evacuate; he wound up at a Catholic school in Houston.

Back in New Orleans the next fall, he switched to a brand-new charter school, KIPP Believe, for fifth through 8th grade; started high school at another charter school, Sci Academy; then was homeschooled for a year.

Now, he’s beginning his senior year of high school. This time at St. Augustine, an all-boys Catholic school famed throughout the region for its marching band.

Five schools in nine years. A generation of children who’ve lived through the storm and recovery have traced educational odysseys like this one.

Q&A: One Student’s Educational Saga In New Orleans

Photo credit: Edmund D. Fountain for NPR