idiosyncratic

wandering through the web

erinpantz:

Ralph Ziman at C.A.V.E. Gallery

I’ve been enamored of these images from Ralph Ziman and had no idea that his show was at C.A.V.E. Gallery until we randomly went there today. Silly of me I know.

But what a treat! When I saw that this was the show they had, I yelled out loud, “yayay!!”

If you’re in LA, go see it. Everything is spectacular and the message is worth your attention.

I really want one of those guns.

yagazieemezi:

ART FEATURE

AFRICAN ARTIST:

Ralph Ziman

Ziman, a South African street artist who now resides in Venice Beach, California, attacks Africa’s dominant gun culture with piercing colors and images that don’t fade from memory. With knitted masks and beaded weapons, Ziman paints Africa’s obsession with guns and the power they provide as so bizarre and overwhelming it’s nearly surreal. Both worshipped and feared, Ziman’s guns appear like dangerous totems from an unknown ritual, somewhat removed from the gun culture we’ve heard so much about. The vendors who star in Ziman’s photos were not at all directed in how to pose with the weapon replicas. Yet the viewer can sense the additional status pulsing through the subjects as they hold their powerful instruments, even if only for the duration of a photograph.

classicladiesofcolor:

The photo source states that this is Victoria Spivey, but this is actually Harlem toe dancer, Honey Brown with director King Vidor and actor/singer, Daniel L. Haynes on the set of Hallelujah! (1929).
Honey Brown was the original choice to play the role of “Chick” in Hallelujah! Many factors contributed to Ms. Brown being replaced by Nina Mae McKinney. You can read about it here in a post by the Hollywood Filmograph (a research site dedicated to Film Restoration).
The post is a lengthy read, but it provides detailed information on the making of the film, gives some insight on what work was like for black performers on an early Hollywood film set, and includes some rare photos. 

classicladiesofcolor:

The photo source states that this is Victoria Spivey, but this is actually Harlem toe dancer, Honey Brown with director King Vidor and actor/singer, Daniel L. Haynes on the set of Hallelujah! (1929).

Honey Brown was the original choice to play the role of “Chick” in Hallelujah! Many factors contributed to Ms. Brown being replaced by Nina Mae McKinney. You can read about it here in a post by the Hollywood Filmograph (a research site dedicated to Film Restoration).

The post is a lengthy read, but it provides detailed information on the making of the film, gives some insight on what work was like for black performers on an early Hollywood film set, and includes some rare photos. 

(Source: acertaincinema.com, via digitaldesperados)

digitaldesperados:

What makes a documentary radical? In this film, artist LaToya Ruby Frazier reveals the personal story behind a series of videos and photographs of her family in Braddock, Pennsylvania, a selection of which were exhibited in “Video Studio: Changing Same” at the Studio Museum in Harlem. Employing and upending documentary traditions as a means to disrupt media stereotypes, Frazier collaborates with her mother and grandmother as fellow artists, giving them agency in depictions of themselves, their family, and the broader community. Interrogating how the toxic geography of Braddock has shaped multiple generations of her family’s bodies and psychology, Frazier’s images of her hometown mirror complex social problems that beset America today such as class inequity, access to health care, and environmental racism. “The mind is the battleground for photography,” says Frazier, who creates images that “tell my story because it hasn’t been told.” Featuring excerpts from the artist’s videos “Grandma Ruby” (2009), “A Mother to Hold” (2006), “Momme Portrait Series (Heads)” (2008), “Momme Portrait Series (Wrestle)” (2009), “Detox (Braddock U.P.M.C.)” (2011), and “Self-Portrait (United States Steel)” (2010), as well as photographs from the series “Notion of Family” (2002-ongoing).

LaToya Ruby Frazier (b. 1982, Braddock, Pennsylvania, USA) lives and works in New Brunswick, New Jersey and New York, New York.

CREDITS | “New York Close Up” Created & Produced by: Wesley Miller & Nick Ravich. Editor: Brad Kimbrough. Cinematography: Don Edler. Additional Camera: LaToya Ruby Frazier. Sound: Nicholas Lindner & Wesley Miller. Associate Producer: Ian Forster. Production Assistant: Paulina V. Ahlstrom, Don Edler, Amanda Long & Maren Miller. Design: Crux Studio & Open. Artwork: LaToya Ruby Frazier. Thanks: Frazier Family, Thomas Lax & Studio Museum in Harlem. An Art21 Workshop Production. © Art21, Inc. 2012. All rights reserved.

"New York Close Up" is supported, in part, by the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council, Toby Devan Lewis, the Dedalus Foundation, Inc., and the Lily Auchincloss Foundation, Inc. Additional support provided by The 1896 Studios & Stages.

For more info: art21.org/newyorkcloseup

(via blackfilm)