idiosyncratic

wandering through the web
shihlun:

Veronica Fieiras: The Disappeared.

shihlun:

Veronica Fieiras: The Disappeared.

aadatart:

Winners of POPCAP’14 Announced

Patrick Willocq is a photographer, who is one of the 5 Winners of POPCAP’14. Patrick won the award for the 2013 series titled, I am Walé Respect Me. For this project, he dove deeply into an initiation ritual of the Ekonda pygmies in the Democratic Republic of Congo. The Ekondas believe that the most important moment in the life of a woman is the birth of her first child.

The young mother (usually 15 to 18) is called Walé (“primiparous nursing mother“). She returns to her parents where she remains secluded for a period of 2 to 5 years. During her seclusion, a Walé is under very special care. She must also respect a taboo on sex during the whole period and is given a similar status to that of a patriarch. The end of her seclusion is marked by a dancing and singing ritual. The choreography and the songs have a very codified structure but also contain unique qualities specific to each Walé. She sings the story of her own loneliness, and with humor praises her own behavior while discrediting her Walé rivals.

This series is a personal reflection of women in general and the Walé ritual specifically. But first and foremost, it is the result of a unique collaboration with young pygmy women, their respective clans, an ethnomusicologist, an artist and many artisans of the forest. Working together, our mutual experiences become richer giving birth to “I am Walé Respect Me”.

Join African & Afro-Diasporan Art Talks (AADAT)
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maximushka:

Testing with Brianna. © Maxim Vakhovskiy

maximushka:

Testing with Brianna. © Maxim Vakhovskiy

indestructiblegem:

Entertainment Weekly- Comic Con Day Three
Orlando Jones, Katia Winter, Lyndie Greenwood, John Noble, Tom Mison, and Nicole Beharie 

indestructiblegem:

Entertainment Weekly- Comic Con Day Three

Orlando Jones, Katia Winter, Lyndie Greenwood, John Noble, Tom Mison, and Nicole Beharie 

(Source: ew.com, via filmtvdiversity)

so-treu:

crankyskirt:

The Life & Times of Doris Payne: A Tale of Carats, Cons, and Creating Your Own American Dream

Find out how a poor, single, African-American mother from segregated 1930s America winds up as one of the world’s most notorious and successful jewel thieves.
A glamorous 83-year-old, Doris Payne is as unapologetic today about the $2 million in jewels she’s stolen over a 60-year career as she was the day she stole her first carat. With Doris now on trial for the theft of a department store diamond ring, we probe beneath her consummate smile to uncover the secrets of her trade and what drove her to a life of crime. Stylized recreations, an extensive archive and candid interviews reveal how Payne managed to jet-set her way into any Cartier or Tiffany’s from Monte Carlo to Japan and walk out with small fortunes. This sensational portrait exposes a rebel who defies society’s prejudices and pinches her own version of the American Dream while she steals your heart.

You damn right, I’m watching this. Shit, I’m pissed that a crew of chicks hasn’t made a concept album in tribute to this woman. #femmeoutlaw
Especially since black criminals have so often been characterized as brutish and ignorant, while jewel theft is lionized as a crime for sophisticated masterminds who outsmart authorities (read: smartypants white dudes who do Mission Impossible type shit).


WHY DIDN’T I KNOW ABOUT HER

so-treu:

crankyskirt:

The Life & Times of Doris Payne: A Tale of Carats, Cons, and Creating Your Own American Dream

Find out how a poor, single, African-American mother from segregated 1930s America winds up as one of the world’s most notorious and successful jewel thieves.

A glamorous 83-year-old, Doris Payne is as unapologetic today about the $2 million in jewels she’s stolen over a 60-year career as she was the day she stole her first carat. With Doris now on trial for the theft of a department store diamond ring, we probe beneath her consummate smile to uncover the secrets of her trade and what drove her to a life of crime. Stylized recreations, an extensive archive and candid interviews reveal how Payne managed to jet-set her way into any Cartier or Tiffany’s from Monte Carlo to Japan and walk out with small fortunes. This sensational portrait exposes a rebel who defies society’s prejudices and pinches her own version of the American Dream while she steals your heart.

You damn right, I’m watching this. Shit, I’m pissed that a crew of chicks hasn’t made a concept album in tribute to this woman. #femmeoutlaw

Especially since black criminals have so often been characterized as brutish and ignorant, while jewel theft is lionized as a crime for sophisticated masterminds who outsmart authorities (read: smartypants white dudes who do Mission Impossible type shit).

WHY DIDN’T I KNOW ABOUT HER